Category Archives: Intellectual

Keeping People to Their Contracts

Following the train of thought that lead to my essay about empowering communities with liberty; I want to write about social change in general. I just had a conversation with a man from Schwan’s, that purveyor of delicious frozen foods.

Did you know that stores may not require a minimum purchase for credit or debit purchases? Some gas stations require at least five dollars for you to pay with credit or debit. Apparently, this is not legal. That fellow from Schwan’s I had a conversation with said that one fellow insisted on paying for a $1.39 pack of gum with his card. When they told the fellow no, he called his bank, who called the credit card company they processed their credit payments through, who then called the company that maintained the register card readers, who then called the gas station company, who then called the gas station and told them to run the purchase for the pack of gum. This story is a mixed bag to me. On the one hand, the man was right and he stood his ground and won. On the other hand, he didn’t change anything. All this man really did was waste a lot of people’s time over a 1.39 pack of gum. Continue reading Keeping People to Their Contracts

My Father’s Boycott

My father was at one time a pastor of a small church in Independence, Missouri. The former superstar of convenience shopping, K-Mart, was up to their shenanigans. They were stocking adult magazines where children could plainly see them. Parents were understandably upset at this and wanted K-Mart to stop. K-Mart however did not seem to care. Enter stage left, my father, the pastor. Continue reading My Father’s Boycott

An Issue of Importance to Me

Our culture is increasingly oppressive, in that people are taught to not speak out or take a stand for themselves and others. From children bullied to corrupt officials going unpunished, we are shown that injustice is the norm to be expected and accepted. Such desensitization and apathy bleeds into all aspects of life, from work habits, to our communal standards of decency and empathy. Unethical behavior towards others is commonplace. The degradation of ethical standards of justice is happening all across the world.

I was told of a prime example of such apathy towards injustice when I lived in Cochabamba, Bolivia. The president of Bolivia arbitrarily raised the price of gasoline to approximately five U.S. dollars per gallon overnight, which was more than twice the normal price. Public transportation doubled their prices to compensate for the increase in fuel cost. A group of children aged 8 to 12 peacefully complained about the price increase on their way to school. The bus driver dragged them out of the bus, and two additional bus drivers joined him in savagely beating the children. No charges were leveled against the drivers. What lesson could those boys have learned other than that to speak out means being beaten and silenced? Continue reading An Issue of Importance to Me

Changing Society Through Communities rather than Politics: An essay on Strategy and Approach

We’ve all been there when the die hard political guy gets up and preaches that we should all endorse his political views because anything else is tantamount to hating poor people or ruining the country. But, what if I told you that many people think the same of libertarians? That you can just as easily replace hating poor people or destroying the country with tyranny.

The fact is, when someone starts talking about politics, any politics, more than half the room is shutting down and the other half probably won’t do anything with what you’re saying. Politics is not persuasive enough to change the majority of people, and a lot of folks just find it offensive. If you would like to check this out, try going out and speaking to people about politics. Odds are, you will either find someone who disagrees with you, does not want to talk about it, or they agree with you but are still too busy to help out with your group or project. Continue reading Changing Society Through Communities rather than Politics: An essay on Strategy and Approach